SA issues survey about Pass/No Pass, aims to push policy into the fall

Media Credit: File Photo by Skylar Epstein | Staff Photographer

SA Sen. Cordelia Scales, SEAS-U and chairwomen of the academic affairs committee, said she worked with SA Executive Vice President Brandon Hill to format the survey, which will close at midnight on July 27.

The Student Association is gathering feedback on the University’s option to take classes on a Pass/No Pass basic in the spring.

The SA released a survey Sunday that asks students about the number of classes they opted to take without a letter grade and their reason for using the policy. SA leaders said they hope to use the responses to advocate for the policy to extend into the fall as GW prepares for some virtual and in-person courses.

“As the University prepares for fall instruction, the lack of communication and uncertainty leaves many students wondering how they can be academically successful,” the survey states. “In an effort to ensure student success in a virtual and in-person environment, the GW Student Association needs your help in ensuring that all students have access to the optional Pass/No Pass grading policy.”

SA Sen. Cordelia Scales, SEAS-U and chairwomen of the academic affairs committee, said she worked with SA Executive Vice President Brandon Hill to format the survey, which will close at midnight on July 27. She said SA members understand various circumstances students are facing – like working from home or facing mental health issues – and the information gathered from the survey can help the SA advocate for the policy to be implemented this fall.

“Things are also really uncertain with new developments weekly, and we may be forced to return home sooner than expected,” Scales said. “Due to these considerations, we want to ensure student success.”

Hill said based on conversations with officials, the University has not discussed a similar Pass/No Pass policy, which prompted SA leaders to issue the survey. Responses from the survey will be shared with Provost Brian Blake, other administrators, students and used in future SA legislation, Hill said.

“There has been a lot of uncertainty based on whether we will be online or in person,” Hill said. “Advocating for Pass/No Pass was something that we wanted to do whether or not we were online or not and felt the best way to get change was to garner student support.”

Hill added that the results of the survey so far have included feedback from graduate students, mainly those at GW Law, who were required to take their classes on a Pass/No Pass basis, Hill said.

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