Oscars-themed dishes to enjoy during the ceremony

Media Credit: Sophia Young | Assistant Photo Editor

To replicate the creamy scrambled eggs in the movie "Sound of Metal," try this recipe from French cuisine deity Julia Child.

Any good watch party is accompanied by excellent food.

The Hatchet rounded up the best dishes to eat while you’re enjoying the Oscars this Sunday. From the scrambled eggs in “Sound of Metal” to ceremony-worthy roasted caprese bites, snack on these four dishes as you watch the ceremony unfold.

Scrambled eggs from “Sound of Metal”

Toward the end of the film “Sound of Metal,” protagonist Ruben flies to Paris to find his girlfriend and eats some soft, creamy French-style scrambled eggs during his visit. To replicate this at home, we turn to our French cooking deity, Julia Child, the lovable American cooking teacher known for her French cuisine.

  • 2 to 3 eggs
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 ½ tablespoons butter
  • Heavy cream to taste

For Child’s method, beat the eggs in a bowl with salt and pepper to taste. Then add all but two teaspoons of the eggs to a nonstick pan coated in one tablespoon of melted butter over low heat. When the eggs are thickened, but still visibly soft, add the remaining egg mixture, the remaining half tablespoon of butter and a splash of heavy cream.

Roasted caprese bites

Class up your party with these caprese bites that won’t disappoint. The snacks don’t take much effort to make, but the result is sure to impress your guests.

  • 12 Campari tomatoes
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 12 small fresh basil leaves, chopped
  • 12 mozzarella ciliegine, dried well
  • ¼ cup panko breadcrumbs
  • 1 ½ tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano

Preheat your oven to 450°F. Hollow out each tomato, then drain on paper towels. Place a sprinkle of salt, basil and a mozzarella ball inside each tomato. Combine ½ teaspoon salt with the breadcrumbs, olive oil and oregano, and sprinkle the mixture on the tomatoes. Bake for 10 minutes until golden brown, then leave to cool for a further 10 minutes.

Minari from “Minari”

Minari, a type of Korean watercress, is the crop around which film “Minari” revolves. The vegetable grows especially well in its second year, after dying and coming back, representing the struggles and journey of the Yi family throughout the film.

Minari is often used as a topping for bibimbap, a Korean rice dish, but try it in this simple side dish for your Oscar watch party. Minari is also known as Chinese celery or Japanese parsley, but if you can’t find it in stores, Western watercress works too.

  • 1 bunch (about 6 to 8 ounces) minari, washed and trimmed
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 chopped scallion
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sugar

Blanch the minari in boiling water seasoned with the salt for 30 seconds, then plunge into an ice bath to stop the minari from cooking further. Add minari to a bowl with the remaining ingredients and mix well.

Parmesan twists

Anything made with puff pastry looks much more difficult to make than it is. These parmesan twists are a crunchy, cheesy delight you won’t be able to resist.

  • 1 sheet frozen puff pastry, defrosted
  • 1 cup grated parmesan, divided into thirds
  • Egg wash

Preheat your oven to 400°F. Scatter a third of the parmesan cheese on a work surface and place the puff pastry on top. Sprinkle with another third of the parmesan. Roll into a rectangle ⅛-inch thick, then fold the pastry in half lengthwise and top with the remaining cheese. Roll out the rectangle to widen, then cut into 12 to 14 strips.

Holding one end of a strip in each hand, twist each end in opposite directions to form a twist. Place twists one inch apart on two baking sheets lined with parchment paper, then brush with egg wash and bake 15 to 20 minutes until golden brown. 

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