SBA Senate ratifies election results after runoff election for president

Media Credit: Anthony Peltier | Photographer

Golaszewski, the elections director, said roughly 44 percent of voters turned out on election day Feb. 23 and 40 percent voted during the runoff the next day, respectively.

The Student Bar Association Senate unanimously ratified the group’s spring election results after a runoff election for the SBA’s top spot at a meeting Tuesday.

Aneta Golaszewski, the SBA’s director of elections, announced that second-year law student Jordan Michel was elected SBA president and SBA Senate Secretary Yun-Da Tsai was elected executive vice president for the upcoming term. Senators also unanimously passed a resolution calling on GW Law officials to lobby against a D.C. Bar Association action requiring law students pursuing a master of laws degree to take 12 in-person credit hours despite the COVID-19 pandemic suspending most in-person classes.

Golaszewski, the elections director, said roughly 44 percent of voters turned out on election day Feb. 23 and 40 percent voted during the runoff the next day, respectively.

“It was a really great campaign season,” she said.

Michel, the SBA president-elect, defeated second-year law student Tyrus Jackson in the runoff, with 41 percent of the vote over Jackson’s 31 percent. Tsai, the executive vice president-elect, received 61 percent of the vote in the original election, not requiring a runoff.

The senate also unanimously passed a resolution calling on law school officials to condemn a D.C. Bar Association vote only allowing LL.M. students to take 14 of their 26 credits virtually during the pandemic to be permitted to take the bar exam.

The resolution, introduced by SBA Sen. Jordan Jones, requests that administrators provide a “unified condemnation” of the bar association’s action and recognize the “detrimental effect” it will have particularly on international students. Jones said the SBA is trying to unify D.C.-based law schools to protest and demand the repeal of the amendment.

“We’re trying to make it more of a joint effort,” she said. “The more people that are aware of it and the more people are filing petitions and comments and appeals, the better.”

Jones said international attorneys pursuing their LL.M. degrees are required to take 26 credit hours at an American Bar Association-approved law school. She said the recent measure is a “disqualification” for all students pursuing their LL.M. degree because it forces them to take classes in person while they mostly remain unavailable.

“We’ve been in contact with a lot of people at this point,” she said. “We are just trying to fight as hard as we can.”

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