Kappa Alpha two-year suspension upheld

The Kappa Alpha fraternity has officially been suspended for two years after their appeal was rejected last week.

Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities Christy Anthony said the University’s Appeals Board issued a decision last Tuesday to uphold Kappa Alpha’s two-year suspension after the organization was found responsible for “conduct violations.” The conclusion is in line with the University Hearing Board’s original decision based on the Code of Student Conduct last month.

Anthony said Stewart Robinette, the assistant dean of residential engagement, reviewed the appeal. She said Robinette was Senior Associate Dean of Students Colette Coleman’s designee to review the appeal.

She said Robinette determined Kappa Alpha provided grounds in its appeal, and the Appeals Board further reviewed the case to determine if the appeal should be granted.

“In their review, the Appeals Board determined that the appeal would not be granted and the original decision, including the two-year suspension, would stand,” Anthony said in an email.

Anthony said last month Kappa Alpha was first alerted of its suspension June 5. Following the outcome of a student conduct proceeding, respondents have five days to submit an appeal if there was a “material deviation” from the procedures that affected the outcome of the student conduct process, there is “new and relevant” information that was unavailable during the proceeding or the sanctions doled out were disproportionate to the respondent’s misconduct.

In addition to Kappa Alpha’s suspension, Anthony said the organization’s housing agreement will be canceled, and the chapter’s townhouse at 605 22nd St. will be reassigned at a later date. The chapter has occupied the townhouse since 2014 after moving out of a floor in International House.

“We are not using any of the townhouses this fall, however it will be reassigned in the future,” Anthony said.

Brent Buswell, the director of communications for Kappa Alpha Order’s national headquarters, said the national chapter was “disappointed” upon hearing about the fraternity’s punishment. Buswell declined to specify what events led to the fraternity’s suspension but said Kappa Alpha officials do not think the punishment was appropriate.

“While we agreed disciplinary measures were necessary, we wanted to give the men grace to learn from their mistakes through education,” Buswell said in an email. “However, we look forward to restoring the chapter in the future.”

Max Summer, who is listed as Kappa Alpha’s primary contact on the chapter’s Engage profile, did not return a request for comment. Seamus McCullen, the president of the Interfraternity Council, did not return a request for comment.

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