Development office staffer dies suddenly at 37

Natalie Larmon, a California native who worked as a senior prospect analyst in the Office of Development and Alumni Relations for more than two years, died unexpectedly on Oct. 31. She was 37.

Larmon’s death was announced in a University release Monday and did not cite a cause of death. She died suddenly overnight while recovering from a recent illness, according to a GoFundMe page set up to support her family.

Former colleagues said Larmon was a dedicated worker who, more than anything, wanted to bring people together.

Donna Arbide, the vice president for development and alumni relations, said Larmon was a “valued” part of the GW community and offered condolences to her family.

Natalie Larmon via LinkedIn

Natalie Larmon, a California native who worked as a senior prospect analyst in the Office of Development and Alumni Relations for more than two years, died unexpectedly on Oct. 31.

“We are all incredibly saddened by her sudden passing,” Arbide said in an email. “She will be greatly missed.”

Larmon was born and lived in southern California for most of her life, and received her undergraduate degree in policy, management and planning from the University of Southern California. Before coming to GW, she worked in the development offices at the California Institute of the Arts and the University of Southern California, according to the University release.

She was also a longtime member of the Association of Professional Researchers for Advancement both in D.C. and in California. She served as the treasurer of the California chapter and most recently served on the programming committee of the D.C. Metro chapter, according to her LinkedIn page.

Larmon also began working at the development consulting firm Bentz Whaley Flesner in October, according to her LinkedIn page.

Andillion Hackney, who was a board member alongside Larmon in the California chapter of Apra, said she was shocked by Larmon’s intellect when they first met at a development conference in California about a decade ago. Larmon was detail-oriented and “unrelenting” in trying to make the organization’s finances and events perfect, Hackney said.

She said Larmon spoke at development conferences and was a “visionary” in the field, continually trying throughout her career to make her profession more efficient.

“She could explain something really complicated to anybody,” Hackney said. “She was generous in her time in that way.”

Hackney said Larmon enjoyed DJing with friends on the weekend. Larmon was good at creating communities and making people want to be with her, Hackney said.

Lisa Johnston, who worked with Larmon in the California chapter of Apra, said Larmon was warm and welcoming to everyone.

She said professionals in the development field – especially those who work in small offices – tend to keep to themselves because they are often wrapped up in their jobs, but Larmon tried to get people to “come out of their shells.”

The organization will dedicate its trivia nights to Larmon, Johnston said. Larmon famously organized a trivia night for a conference on British trivia that everyone enjoyed, Johnston said.

“Natalie’s death was a shock and a huge loss,” she said in an email.

John Rivett, who worked as a board member with Larmon at the California chapter of Apra, said she was “committed” to her job. Even after she began working at GW, Larmon flew back to California to help the organization, Rivett said.

He said she never said anything negative about anyone else and always acted in a professional manner.

“She had such a professional, cheery demeanor that was contagious,” he said in an email.

James Vermillion, the president of the California chapter of Apra, said during the 2008 financial crisis, Larmon helped stabilize the organization’s finances by formalizing how the group tracked expenses.

“She helped turn our financial situation around,” he said. “The board was honored to have worked with her.”

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