Cost of attendance to approach $70,000 next academic year

Media Credit: Sam Hardgrove | Assistant Photo Editor

Nelson Carbonell, the chairman of the Board of Trustees, said the tuition increases are largely directed toward faculty salaries and staff raises every year.

GW’s tuition will grow by about 3 percent next academic year for the 11th consecutive year.

The Board of Trustees unanimously approved a 3.2 percent tuition hike at a meeting Friday, bringing freshman tuition to more than $55,000 next academic year. Last year, the Board passed a 3 percent rise in tuition, consistent with increases approved over the last several years.

The University will now charge new students a total of about $69,070 for their year at GW, compared to last year’s $66,478 total cost of attendance, a 3.9 percent increase.

Tuition will remain fixed for current freshmen, meaning they will pay the same rate all four of their years at the University, a policy started in 2004.

The total cost of attendance will increase by about 3.9 percent next academic year depending on a student’s housing assignment. The price hike is larger than in recent years as the University rolls out a new meal plan that includes more dining dollars, especially for students without a kitchen in their residence hall rooms.

The dining plan will now cost $2,800 for students living in residence halls with in-room kitchens and $4,600 for students without kitchens.

Nelson Carbonell, the chairman of the Board of Trustees, said the tuition increases are largely directed toward faculty salaries and staff raises every year.

Carbonell said the University would re-evaluate financial aid packages next year with the increase in dining dollars as well as the Trump administration’s decision to phase out the federal Perkins student loan program.

“I don’t know if we’ll be able to make up the entire gap, but we’re going to work hard to make sure we can reach some solution for students,” he said.

Last May, the Board approved the largest one-year increase to the financial aid pool in seven years.

Caitlyn Phung contributed reporting.

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