Avoid class registration catastrophe with these back up courses

Media Credit: Ethan Stoler | Contributing Photo Editor

If your schedule doesn’t pan out perfectly, don’t worry – here’s a list of backup courses you can add to your schedule for students in each school.

The day that has been looming throughout your Colonial Inauguration experience has almost arrived: registration day.

You’ve likely planned out the dream schedule of classes and breaks, including when to ride the Mount Vernon Express to University Writing and most importantly, when to nap.

Once registration day comes, and you join most of the unlucky ones, your schedule will probably look quite different from your original version. But if your schedule doesn’t pan out perfectly, don’t worry – here’s a list of backup courses you can add to your schedule for students in each school.

Columbian College of Arts and Sciences
Jackie Robinson: Race, Sports, and the American Dream
Department: Sociology
Professor: Richard Zamoff
Schedule: Monday and Wednesday – 12:45 to 2 p.m.

By studying former Major League Baseball star Jackie Robinson’s fight against stereotypes through his journey to become the first African American MLB player, you can get an inside look at racism’s impact on the country and more specifically the world of sports. Although this course doesn’t count for a general requirement in CCAS, the unique topic is worth straying from the required courses. If you’re undecided about your major, taking this class will give you the opportunity to dabble in aspects of both history and sociology.

Elliott School of International Affairs
Introduction to World Religions
Department: Religion
Professor: Jon Wood
Schedule: Tuesday and Thursday – 9:35 to 10:50 a.m.

Finish up your first required humanities course by probing into some of the major world religions, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism and Daoism. Learn the rituals as well as the moral and social aspects of these religions from around the globe. Religion drives the actions of many around the world, and this course will give you an inside look into how religion influences international affairs as you try to keep up with international news.

School of Engineering and Applied Science
Leadership and Management I
Department: Naval Science
Professor: Ross Piper
Schedule: Tuesday and Thursday – 8:00 to 9:15 a.m.

Build up your decision making and leadership skills by learning how to manage a naval organization. The class, which ticks off a required humanities course for SEAS, teaches values like accountability, responsibility and communication, which can be applied to leadership roles at any job. Make sure to also sign up for the discussion session with this one, held on Fridays from 7:00 to 9:15 a.m.

School of Business
Biological Anthropology
Department: Anthropology
Professor: Alison Brooks
Schedule: Mondays and Wednesdays – 12:45 to 2 p.m.

Get your science requirement out of the way without getting too technical in this expansive course and lab. Biological anthropology will walk you through the evolutionary and genetic development of the human species and other primates. Take a look at different primate bone structures, and you will get a chance to head to the Smithsonian’s National Zoo or the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History for a lab.

Milken Institute School of Public Health
Human Sexuality
Department: Health and Wellness
Professor: Sarah Axelson, Susan Milstein and Erin Snowden
Schedule: Monday – 3:30 to 6 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday – 11:10 a.m. to 12:25 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays – 12:45 to 2 p.m. or Thursday – 6:10 to 8:40 p.m.

Throw your mother’s rules out the window and take the opportunity to talk about a taboo topic in the classroom in Human Sexuality. Fulfill a public health elective by learning more about the psychological and biological health aspects behind sexual behavior and development. This course will give you a closer look at research on human sexuality, sexual identity and the societal influence on sexual issues – all modern issues that involve the medical world as well as your personal life.

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