SA president refuses to present new EVP nominee

Student Association Andie Dowd said she will not appoint another nominee for executive vice president. Jordan McDonald | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Student Association Andie Dowd said she will not appoint another nominee for executive vice president.
Jordan McDonald | Hatchet Staff Photographer
This post was written by staff writers Sera Royal and Crystel Sylvester.

Student Association President Andie Dowd said she will not nominate a second candidate to serve as executive vice president.

Dowd said during an address at the senate meeting Monday night that her first nominee, Zack Speck, was qualified for the position. Speck needed a simple majority to win, but lost by two votes, to replace former executive vice president Casey Syron, who resigned last month.

Dowd sat in on a 20-minute closed executive session during the last senate meeting to answer questions about Speck, who’s served on the SA for three years. Interim Executive Vice President Thomas Falcigno has now served in the role for nearly a month.

Sen. Brady Forrest, CCAS-G, said he was “confused” about her decision not to nominate another candidate to relieve Interim Executive Vice President Thomas Falcigno.

“You say you want to collaborate with us and I’m not sure why you aren’t nominating someone,” he said.

Dowd said she was willing to meet with members of the senate but noted that no members had reached out to her to discuss a possible replacement.

“I’m going to focus on my projects,” she said. “I nominated someone that fulfilled qualifications. He is my nominee and I’m going to stick with that.”

The senate also formally passed a set of reforms presented by a special subcommittee which reviewed the senate’s financial bylaws. The group presented a series of changes to the way student organizations are funded at the last senate meeting.

The SA expects its budget, half of which is funded by student activity fees and then matched by GW, to increase by about 10 percent next year, bringing its total budget to $1.37 million. The recommendations add about $30,000 to the pool of money set aside for appeals, funds that groups can apply for if they are unhappy with their original allotment.

Associate Dean of Students Tim Miller said during public comment that a survey to gauge student interest in a discounted WMATA program will be conducted in the next two weeks. The senate will discuss at its Feb. 22 meeting adding the referendum to the election ballot.

“If this becomes a full thing that the University does, it could give $4.5 million annually to WMATA. It’s a really big commitment if this is something you decide to do,” he said.

Miller said as the deal with WMATA currently stands, students would pay about $240 per year through their tuition payment. Syron, the former executive vice president, proposed the discount, and it would be implemented incrementally over four years.

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