D.C. stands with Paris in Lafayette Square vigil

A crowd of several hundred gathered in Lafayette Square near the White House on Saturday evening to show solidarity for the people of France. At least 129 people were killed and hundreds more injured in coordinated attacks across Paris on Friday night, the New York times reported.

Updated Nov. 15, 2015 at 10:40p.m.

Paige James | Hatchet Photographer
A group gathered in Lafayette Square on Saturday as the sun began to set. French Ambassador to the United States, Gérard Araud had announced the vigil on Twitter earlier in the day. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

While some attendees held signs of support others carried red, white, and blue flower – the colors of the French tricolor – which they laid at the base of the Statue of the Marquis de Lafayette. Marquis de Lafayette, a French aristocrat and officer who fought in the Revolutionary War, is often viewed as a symbol of strength between the alliance of France and the United States. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer
While some attendees held signs of support others carried red, white, and blue flower – the colors of the French tricolor – which they laid at the base of the Statue of the Marquis de Lafayette. Marquis de Lafayette, a French aristocrat and officer who fought in the Revolutionary War, is often viewed as a symbol of strength between the alliance of France and the United States. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

Araud spoke about the importance of standing with the people of France in the wake of the attacks. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer
Araud spoke about the importance of standing with the people of France in the wake of the attacks. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

4Vigil_PJ
Sukiuye Yiildirim, who is from Turkey, held a sign calling for peace as Araud spoke. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

Yiildirim shared her sign with the crowd, who added their signatures in support. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer
Yiildirim shared her sign with the crowd, who added their signatures in support. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

Members of the crowd sang
Members of the crowd sang “La Marseillaise,” the French national anthem, as the French tricolor flew overhead. Paige James | Hatchet Photographer

 

Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer
Petite Valentine holds a small sign which reads “#NotAfraid #ParisIsAboutLife friends from the whole world, thank you for #prayforParis, but we don’t need more religion! Our faith goes to music! Kisses! Life! Champagne and Joy! #ParisisaboutLife” Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

 

Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer
Amanda Tatun holds a candle at the vigil. Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

 

Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer
Sophie Bethune (left) a D.C. resident, stands with her sons, Ewan Bethune-Smith age three and Soren Bethune-Smith age six, as candles are distributed to the crowd. Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

 

Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer
“We Stand with Paris” the network which promoted the vigil on social media, has promoted vigils in major cities across the United States today to show solidarity with the people of France. Jillian DiPersio | Hatchet Photographer

 

This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly spelled Ewan Bethune-Smith’s name in a photo caption. We regret this error.

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