SA candidates poster campus for upcoming election

Candidates rush to get their posters hung outside of Marvin. Katie Causey | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Candidates rush to get their posters hung outside the Marvin Center. Katie Causey | Hatchet Staff Photographer

This post was written by Hatchet reporter Catherine Moran.

Student Association candidates and their supporters covered campus with posters for their campaigns early Monday morning.

While you were sleeping, here’s what the morning looked like for students hoping to secure a position on the SA.

6:30 a.m.

Team members began grouping together in Kogan Plaza, braving the early morning darkness and chill.

“It’s a nightmare,” said Alyssa Weakley, who’s running for undergraduate School of Business senator. “It’s crazy, but it’s exciting.”

Executive vice presidential candidate Casey Syron said the posters were a way for candidates to have fun with their campaigns.

“It’s such a fun event that lets you geek out about politics,” he said.

7 a.m.

A few minutes before 7 a.m., the groups made their way to the H street Kogan Plaza entrance and waited for the signal to start postering.

Seconds later, a crowd raced toward the Marvin Center. Smaller groups hurried over to Phillips Hall or sprinted to University Yard.

7:15 a.m.

Supporters of candidates place posters outside of Marvin. Judy Lim | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Supporters of different candidates taped up posters early Monday morning. Judy Lim | Hatchet Staff Photographer

As the sun rose, the walls by the J Street entrance became covered in packing tape and multicolored posters. Team members ran supplies back and forth between the Marvin Center and Phillips Hall.

Columbian College of Arts and Sciences undergraduate senator candidate Erika Feinman said she preferred using social media over hanging up posters for her campaign.

“Everyone does something different,” she said.

EVP candidate Carlo Wood said he only hung up three or four posters to best utilize his campaign budget. EVP candidates are allowed to spend up to $1,000 on their campaigns.

“Moving forward, I hope this sets a precedent for others to feel comfortable to participate in future elections,” he said.

7:30 a.m.

Thirty minutes after the start time, the candidates and crowds had left, with only their posters as marks of the hundreds who came out earlier in the morning.

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