Siemens gives engineering students access to $30 million worth of software

University President Steven Knapp announced a partnership with Siemens that will provide new software for student use. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor
University President Steven Knapp announced a partnership with Siemens that will provide new software for student use. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor

GW’s engineering students will now have access to some of the best software in the field, thanks to a collaboration with Siemens.

The partnership will allow students in the School of Engineering and Applied Science to use $30 million worth of software and is the first of multiple phases in an agreement between the company and GW.

“Obviously, a lot of the work that’s done these days requires sophisticated software,” University President Steven Knapp said in an interview. “Siemens is really at the forefront of a lot of advanced manufacturing technology.”

The product lifecycle management software, which is already available to universities across the country, will allow students to work with programs they wouldn’t otherwise use until after graduation.

Matt Bruce, an academic director of Americas Velocity Program for Siemens’ product lifecycle management, said students will be able to use the software for projects like creating 3-D, state-of-the-art models.

Students, administrators, faculty and staff gathered on the main floor of the Science and Engineering Hall to celebrate the building's grand opening Wednesday. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor
Students, administrators, faculty and staff gathered on the main floor of the Science and Engineering Hall to celebrate the building’s grand opening Wednesday. Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor

He added that students enrolled in programs at the Virginia Science and Technology Campus and the School of Medicine and Health Sciences will be able to use the software for collaborative projects with students in SEAS.

“Delivering the industry’s most advanced product lifecycle management technology, Siemens product lifecycle management software provides students with the skills, knowledge and experience required to stand out in today’s highly competitive economy, and better prepare them for entering the workforce,” he said.

The announcement was made during the grand opening of the Science and Engineering Hall. The $275 million complex, which has been in the works for more than a decade, opened for classes in January and houses 118 faculty from GW’s engineering and science departments.

Funding for the building shifted after officials revealed earlier this year that the plans to pay for the space using government subsidies and donations fell through. The University is now depending entirely on rent from its commercial properties at The Avenue to pay for the complex.

Board of Trustees Chairman Nelson Carbonell thanked all those who helped open the Science and Engineering Hall, but asked them to continue to support the building through the years.

“All of us here collectively feel responsible for making this a success, but I wanted to call on each and every one of you as individuals to do your part,” he said. “If each of us take on that responsibility, then each of our efforts to get here will be worth while.”

Colleen Murphy contributed reporting.

This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly referred to Siemens as the Siemens Foundation. We regret this error.

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