Corcoran students meet with top officials in town hall talks

Media Credit: Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the Columbian College, Teresa Murphy, center, will serve as deputy provost starting in January. Hatchet File Photo by Sara Gleysteen, Hatchet Photographer

Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Planning Forrest Maltzman, left, and other top University administrators listened to Corcoran students discuss their schools merger with GW at a town hall meeting Monday afternoon. Sara Gleysteen | Hatchet Photographer
Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Planning Forrest Maltzman, left, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Teresa Murphy and Dean of Student Affairs Peter Konwerski listened to Corcoran students discuss their schools merger with GW at a town hall meeting Monday afternoon. Sara Gleysteen | Hatchet Photographer

Updated: Feb. 24, 2015 at 10:05 a.m.

This post was written by Hatchet reporter Noah Olsen.

About 60 students from the Corcoran College met with top GW administrators in a town hall Monday to air concerns about their experience in the merger process.

Top officials including Dean of Student Affairs Peter Konwerski, Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Planning Forrest Maltzman and Vice Provost for Safety and Security Darrell Darnell attended the meeting.

Here are some of the key takeaways:

1. Corcoran Students said they felt ignored and neglected

Several Corcoran students spoke up during the town hall to say they felt GW ignored them in the merger process.

“I came to Corcoran because it was a small school. to see this building sad and pale is terrible. What is the thought process behind having all student services on GW’s Foggy Bottom campus?” one student said. The students did not give their names during the session.

Director of GW Housing Programs Seth Weinshel said at the forum that some students applied to live in an arts affinity next year to help keep a sense of community on GW’s campus.

2. Corcoran graduate programs to be housed on Mount Vernon Campus

Because GW is in the process of selling the Corcoran’s Georgetown building and renovating its 17th street building, the Corcoran’s graduate programs will move to the Mount Vernon campus next fall, said Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Teresa Murphy.

One graduate student raised a concern, however, that parking on the Mount Vernon campus will cost about $700 per semester to park overnight, compared to lower costs at the Fillmore building in Georgetown.

TRR Sotheby’s International Realty is the listing agent for the Fillmore building, which went on the market for $14 million last month.

3. Students want 24/7 access to studio space

Students said during the town hall that their main concern is not getting access to their studio spaces after the Corcoran’s buildings close at night.

Darnell said that within the next month he hopes to have GWorld readers installed in the Corcoran’s 17th street building so students can get into the studio spaces they need.

“Right now if you are in the building at closing you are allowed to stay,” Darnell said. “GW has a lot of new buildings that need security this year, we’re struggling to expand to meet all this year’s new security requirements.”

This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that Associate Dean of Students Tim Miller said GW will create an arts affinity for Corcoran students to live in next fall. Miller did not speak during the program. Seth Weinshel, who runs GW’s housing office, said students applied to live in an arts affinity next fall. We regret this error.

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