Recent graduate among three new members to join Board of Trustees

The University’s highest governing body elected three new members last week, including a recent graduate.

Three alumni will join the Board of Trustees in July, GW announced in a release Monday.

Sally Nuamah, a race, education and public policy researcher, will become one of the board’s youngest members just three years after earning her bachelor’s degree from GW. She was awarded the University’s Manatt-Trachtenberg Prize before graduating magna cum laude in 2011.

A Ph.D. student at Northwestern University, Nuamah has conducted research across the U.S., Ghana and South Africa for several groups including the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Triple alumnus Kyle Farmbry will also join the board. The acting dean of Rutgers University’s Graduate School-Newark and an associate professor of public affairs and administration, Farmbry is also the vice president of communications for GW’s alumni association.

In 2009, he was named as one of about three dozen Fulbright New Century scholars and previously earned a grant to study nongovernmental organizations combating HIV/AIDS in Japan.

The third trustee elected last week, Art Wong, is a physician and co-founder of the the Emergency Physicians Medical Group. He is a member of the board of San Francisco’s YMCA and has served on the School of Medicine and Health Sciences’ Dean’s Council for the last decade.

Trustees are expected to help the University attract future donors, a key role as GW embarks on a $1 billion fundraising campaign.

They have also been some of the University’s most notable donors. In April, chair Nelson Carbonell gave $2.5 million to create an autism research hub at GW, and the following month trustee Mark Shenkman donated $5 million to rename Ivory Tower – the largest-ever gift from a sitting trustee.

Earlier this year, Michael Milken donated $50 million to rename the public health school after Shenkman spent years encouraging the billionaire philanthropist to give to GW.

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