Former lecturer charged with espionage in Egypt

A former lecturer in the Elliott School of International Affairs was charged with espionage in Egypt alongside leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood on Wednesday.

Emad Shahin, a professor at the American University in Cairo who taught at GW in the 1990s, was charged for working with foreign governments to overthrow Egypt’s government two weeks ago. He was a critic of the military takeover last summer.

In an email statement, Shahin denied all charges and any involvement in the Muslim Brotherhood, adding that those who knew him would consider the charges “not merely as improbable but as beyond preposterous.”

“Though I have always been a fervent critic of authoritarian rule in Egypt, I have always expressed strong support for peaceful protests to restore democracy and express popular opposition against government repression,” Shahin said.

GW political science professor Nathan Brown called the charges “laughable.”

“I would sooner believe that Vice President Biden is a member of the Symbionese Liberation Army than I would give credence to the charges against Emad,” he told the New York Times.

Shahin was also critical of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi’s regime, although he had said the Muslim Brotherhood could be influential in a peaceful restoration of government in Egypt.

In addition to lecturing at GW, and has also taught at Harvard University and Notre Dame.

Before he could be arrested, Shahin fled the country for D.C. and attended a conference at Georgetown University on Wednesday.

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