QuickTakes

Girl Talk

“All Day”

(Illegal Art)

The sheer volume of Girl Talk’s “All Day” downloads slowed the artist’s website almost to a standstill, but all that hype feels anticlimactic after hearing the album. Sure, Gregg Gillis, the artist behind Girl Talk, delivered a great album of mashups, but it’s nothing special. “All Day” sounds like an extension of “Feed the Animals,” Girl Talk’s 2008 album. The tracks have the same feel, and even sample some of the same songs. Redeeming moments on the album include tracks, “Get It Get It” and “Down for the Count.” Expectably, the CD would make a great party playlist, but certainly doesn’t break any new ground.

Katie Donham


Wavves

“King of the Beach”

(Fat Possum Records)

“King of the Beach” is another album that embraces California’s beach culture. With multiple references to the gleaming sun, surfing and a laidback attitude, the album brings summer back to life even in the midst of January chills. Tracks such as “Convertible Balloon,” “When Will You Come,” and “Baby Say Goodbye” sound like a resurgence of the Beach Boys with the drawn out “oohs” and “ahhs” in the chorus. Aside from borrowing from the ’60s, Wavves adds more of a punk edge in “Green Eyes,” “Linus Spacehead” and the title track. The band, now on its third release, has undergone a noticeable evolution: The tracks are less noisy and are devoid of the fuzzed guitars that dominated their previous self-titled album.

Christina Oriel


Florence + the Machine

“Lungs”

(Island Records)

Though America had to wait a full year for “Lungs” to be released stateside, this British band’s first LP was well worth the wait. Gaining overwhelming recognition through the Eat, Pray, Love trailer, “Dog Days Are Over” was an overnight sensation, culminating with a performance on the MTV Video Music Awards and a cover on Fox’s hit show “Glee.” Lead singer Florence Welch’s voice sounds even more impressive live, with a bluesy and soulful tone reminiscent of Eva Cassidy. Must-listens are “Drumming Song,” “Cosmic Love,” “Hurricane Drunk” and their newest single, “Heavy In Your Arms.”

Marissa Driscoll


Robyn

“Body Talk”

(Konichiwa Records)

With all the honesty of a diary, Robyn’s “Body Talk” is the admissions of a pop star, revealing her vulnerability and sincere remarks on love and relationships. The album chronicles Robyn’s flaws in songs like “Don’t Fucking Tell Me What to Do,” and her desperation for a man in “Dancing on My Own,” which precedes the heartbreaking “Hang With Me.” By the end of the album Robyn emerges from her breakup stronger than ever, with “In My Eyes” and “Stars 4-Ever.” “Body Talk” feels like a descendant of Madonna’s “Confessions on a Dance Floor” with all its nightlife drama. With 15 dance floor anthems, Robyn can be queen of club culture; everyone else can have Gaga.

Joseph Miranda

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