Partying for pay

On an average workday, David Jumper parties until 5 a.m.

For the last four years, Jumper, a senior, has run VIP-D.C., a party-planning company, along with Zack Huhn, a senior at American.

The duo promotes at Ultrabar, Lotus, Josephine and Mezza Luna. Jumper launched his own DJ booking company, Scratch Stars, last week with a big bash at Mezza Luna.

Among the many DJs performing at the event were sophomore Elias Menninger and junior Michael Cignarale, who perform together as Electro Magnetic Pulse. After DJing at Greek-letter life parties for a year, the two contacted event planners and promoters and eventually started working with VIP-D.C.

Menninger said he picked up DJing after attending a music festival in high school.

Electro Magnetic Pulse’s main motivation for DJing lies in their desire to “bring real house music, rather than Top 40 songs, to campus,” said Menninger.

To distinguish themselves from other DJs, whom they consider “iTunes DJs,” the duo creates their own blend of trance and house music.

But, being a DJ or a promoter means balancing class and parties – more than the average student at least.

“Promoters who indulge in their own product ultimately fail,” Jumper said.

One of Jumper’s favorite events to promote is VIP-D.C.’s semi-annual fundraiser, which is thrown in association with a variety of philanthropic organizations within D.C. This semester, the company is partnered with an organization that develops soccer fields for children in impoverished communities worldwide.

Cignarale said the rush he feels when DJing helps him connect with his audience.

“If you’re not dancing the hardest to your own beats, why should others?”

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