CPS, GSPM: Nobel prize winner encourages the study of science

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Nobel prize winner Leon Ledermen emphasized the importance of teachers and science in a speech to the graduates of the College of Professional Studies and the Graduate School of Political Management at Lisner Auditorium Saturday.

Lederman won the prize in 1988 for discovering of ‘neutrino’ particles – which travel at light speed but do not have an electric charge. He is formerly the director of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois which houses large circular structures used to accelerate particles to high speeds.

“We need to have a population that is more comfortable with science.because everything we do in this world has a science effort,” Lederman said.

He said that graduates should use their education to teach others, something Lederman has highlighted throughout his career.

“What really encourages me a lot is the need that this nation has for teachers at all levels,” he said, adding that they should have expertise in math, science and technology.

Lederman stressed that educators should have 20 percent of their time to spend on becoming better teachers. “That’s three weeks in Iraq,” he said.

LaWanna Khalid, who earned her master’s in paralegal studies, emphasized in a speech to the graduates that they should give back to others.

She said, “As you rise to the top, remember to reach out and inspire someone – as someone has undoubtedly inspired you today.”

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