Letters to the Editor

Don’t ignore women’s rugby

In the April 19 article describing GW’s men’s rugby team (“Rugby squad scrums in D.C.,” p. 10), I was shocked and disappointed to see no mention of the women’s rugby team. The intent of the article appeared to be to educate our school about a lesser-known sport, yet you completely ignored a major part of GW Rugby.

As an active player and member of the team’s executive board, I feel I must draw attention to the success of my own team, as we also went 2-1 in our bracket at the same prestigious Cherry Blossom Tournament. Furthermore, I am offended that a Hatchet reporter could not make his way to the practice fields before the last weekend of the men’s season, effectively eliminating any opportunity to speak to the women. Having practiced in the snow and ice in February, my teammates certainly deserve to gain some recognition before the end of our season after much hard work.

This fall marked the 10th anniversary of women’s rugby at GW, an important milestone for any women’s sport, particularly one so uncommon in the United States. We have been consistently successful and have participated in the Cherry Blossom Tournament for the past four years.

After highlighting the success of the women’s basketball team and chastising the GW community for our apathy towards women’s sports, I find it hypocritical that The Hatchet would not only leave out important information about GW Rugby as a whole, but also ignore the women’s team completely.

-Sara Zaremba, Sophomore

Defending Spring Fling

With regards to The Hatchet Editorial Board calling Spring Fling a flop this year (“Thumbs up thumbs down,” Apr. 26, p. 4), perhaps its rampant “flopitude” has less to do with it being a bad event and more to do with the fact that it was storming that day. The editorial staff may not be aware, but most people tend to stay indoors when the alternative is sloshing around in soaked chucks.

Secondly, I know a hefty number of people who were ecstatic about Regina Spektor performing. Any lack of attendance due to the choice of music artist is attributable entirely to GW students’ chronic bad taste. Let’s all hope the University can score a more mediocre performer next year.

-Josh Bumpus, Junior

Commencement disappoints parents too

As the mother of both a GW graduating senior and a sophomore, I could not be more disappointed with the University at the moment with respect to this Commencement keynote speaker fiasco.

Five years ago, when my son and I first toured GW, our student tour guide proudly advised us that students graduate on the Ellipse in front of the White House. He mentioned that, on occasion, the President was known to fly overhead in the Marine One helicopter. Both my son and I have looked forward to that day ever since. Now that day is upon us and the excitement has been dampened not only by the fact that the Ellipse will not be the setting for this long-anticipated event, but also that the much-anticipated high- profile keynote speaker will also be absent.

My son and his friends felt certain that University President Stephen Joel Trachtenberg would pull out all the stops and stop at nothing to ensure that his last Commencement ceremony would include a speaker of the highest distinction. Now, at the 11th hour, he conveniently used the tragic events at Virginia Tech as an excuse to bow out and save himself what was surely to be the embarrassment of a very poor reception if he took the stage as keynote speaker.

I am shocked and saddened that he can so callously dismiss the fact that he does not anticipate announcing a replacement speaker, unless of course, “the Queen of England changes her mind.” Well Mr. Trachtenberg, in light of the debacle you have created, this graduating class deserves nothing less. Now is the time to redeem yourself and bid your farewell to the GW community with the introduction of a keynote speaker for the record books.

-Celia Becker, GW parent

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