Candidacy of lone EVP hopeful in jeopardy

Executive vice presidential candidate Morgan Corr will be disqualified from this week’s Student Association election if three new violations against him are upheld.

In an unexpected development, former Sen. Asher Corson and Sen. Tim Saccoccia (CCAS-U) have announced write-in campaigns for the position, the former making his candidacy public after Corr’s alleged infractions. Corson is running on the “Clean Slate” ticket – of which he is the only member – and Saccoccia is on the Students First team.

Corr, a member of presidential candidate Ben Traverse’s “Coalition for Reform” slate, is three violations away from being booted from the election. Corr had four violations as of Wednesday night; he was acquitted of a fifth infraction. Thursday is the second and last day of voting.

Sen. Ryan Kilpatrick (ESIA-U), who has ties to Students First but is not running for re-election, submitted one of the new violations to the Joint Elections Committee, alleging that Corr abused his power as vice chair of the Senate Rules Committee by calling for a special Senate meeting last week to revise JEC rules.

“In petitioning for last Friday’s special Senate meeting, holding four proxies and trying to manipulate the election rules four days before the election, Morgan will be found in violation of the section 93 of the JEC charter,” Kilpatrick said.

Section 93 states that “any candidate engaging in campaigning who shall negligently disrupt or have the potential to disrupt a function of the University or the government shall be penalized.”

Kilpatrick’s violation has been submitted to the JEC, but no probable cause has been found. If found guilty, the charge would come with a three-violation penalty.

A student heavily involved in the election said another violation may be filed Thursday, involving a meet-and-greet event for “Coalition for Reform” members sponsored Monday night at the Thai Place restaurant. The campaign official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said alcohol was served to underage students at the unregistered student organization-sponsored event.

If the JEC finds probable cause on a potential alcohol violation, Corr could be summoned by the oversight body and face another three-violation penalty.

The JEC will be meeting Thursday night to review newly submitted violations. As of early Thursday morning, Corr was still an eligible candidate for EVP on the ballot.

For a candidate to win the EVP post, he must garner 40 percent of the overall student vote. If no candidate reaches the 40 percent threshold, the top two finishers compete in a run-off election scheduled for March 9 and 10. If Corr is removed, his votes will be disqualified; but JEC officials are unsure whether those votes would be combined with Corson and Saccoccia’s votes in the final tally.

Corson was dismissed as a Hatchet columnist following his announcement.

“When Asher became a columnist, he assured us he was removing himself from active campus politics so as to maintain his and our credibility to readers as an independent student voice,” Hatchet Editor in Chief Brian Costa said. “By entering the race, he compromises his independence and credibility as a columnist, and we will not compromise ours.”

Corson said he is a candidate with the same ideals as Corr and is running in case Corr is kicked out of the election.

“I think the people that are trying to get Morgan kicked off the ballot are corrupt and that Morgan is an honest candidate,” Corson said. “If Morgan is kicked off the ballot students should have another honest choice for EVP, not a corrupt one.”

Saccoccia announced his EVP write-in campaign Wednesday, before the allegations of potential violations.

“I was helping my roommate Govind (Kilambi) on his campaign and we got to talking about issues … and I realized there were some things I still haven’t accomplished,” said Saccoccia, who was planning to leave the SA last year.

Saccoccia said he has been postering in line with JEC regulations and has been talking to students to get the word out about his campaign. He plans to run a campaign based on student life issues, such as improving advising and making “the Marvin Center a true student center.”

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