More than 2,100 prospective students on wait list

About 2,100 prospective students remain on a waiting list to come to GW in the fall, said Kathryn Napper, director of Undergraduate Admissions.

Last year, the waiting list consisted of 700 students.

The last of the regular decision applicants were notified earlier this month about whether they can come to GW next semester. Prospective students have until Saturday to send in their intent forms and deposits.

Napper said GW will offer admission to about 600 students still on the waiting list by mid-May.

The University plans to admit a class of 2,400 students. Last year, The Hatchet reported that the GW hoped for 2,250 students, but enrolled 2,400.

This year, GW admitted 7,426 undergraduate students for the fall – almost 500 more than last year.

Of the admitted student pool, 6,233, applied through regular decision, while 750 applied through Early Decision I and 443 applied through Early Decision II, both binding programs.

The average incoming student ranked in the top 10 percent of his class and scored a 1315 on the SAT, Napper said.

The University received 20,014 applications for the fall semester, a record number.

Napper said she expects this year’s yield rate, or how many students GW accepts versus how many actually plan to attend, to fall around 32.2 percent, a decrease from 34 percent last year.

“This marginal deviation from last year is forecasted to be attributed to competition factors in the conversion stage of admissions activity for higher qualified applicants,” she said.

The University also saw a “substantial increase” in accepted Hispanic and black students.

“This increase is due in part to the outreach programs that we instituted in the Admissions Office with our Student Multicultural Admissions Recruitment Team as well as the exceptional work of the Multicultural Student Services Center,” Napper said.

Amelia Skolnick, a high school senior from Scarsdale, N.Y., will be attending GW in the fall. She said she was “thrilled” when she found out that she was accepted as an Early Decision I applicant.

Skolnick said she hopes to pursue a humanities major such as English or history. She said she was drawn to the University because of its “great reputation” and location in D.C.

“I love the city,” she said. “I didn’t want to be in the middle of nowhere.”

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