The Colonial Century: Upon further review

Trying to pull together all the threads of a century in GW sports – and do it perfectly – is a near impossible task. From feedback and research that sometimes came too late, these are the most regretful oversights. Anything not listed here you can assume we stand by – for the moment, at least.

o The long-defunct GW rifle team was one of the most successful programs in the school’s history, and it should have been noted as a team of the century.

o Bob Considine (’21) was an original inductee to the GW Athletic Hall of Fame in 1959 for tennis. But he should have made the `suits’ of the century for his later work as a Washington Post sportswriter (covering the Colonials in their football heyday of the 1930s) and more importantly as a nationally renowned syndicated columnist. His column On the Line with Considine made his a national name. He also wrote more than 25 books, including Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo and The Babe Ruth Story with Babe Ruth.

o The 1908 football team went 8-1-1, outscoring its opponents by 296 to 28, losing only to Navy 17-0. GW beat Maryland 77-0 (in a game shortened because it was 50-0 at half) and Virginia Tech 6-0. This squad should have been mentioned as a great team of the century.

o In naming the Jon Feldman-led 95-92 victory over No. 5 West Virginia in 1960 as the fourth-greatest game of the century, the contest was done a great injustice. Not because of its rank, but because it was not mentioned that, in addition to Jon Feldman’s 42 points, Jerry West had 40 points and 31 rebounds for the Mountaineers.

It should have also have been mentioned that the game took place at Uline Arena, also known as the Washington Coliseum. This is where Red Auerbach first coached in the NBA with the Washington Capitols, and it’s where the Beatles, in 1964, gave their first American concert.

o Bill Cantwell (’49) was men’s basketball Southern Conference first team in 1947, and he should have been listed on the 35 man all-time team.

o Mike Tallent (’72) was men’s basketball Southern Conference first team in 1970 and also should have been listed on the 35-man all-time team. This might have alleviated what has surely been a hard time for him, considering his two brothers, Pat and Bob, both made the all-time second team.

o Andy Turnage, men’s water polo coach for several years in the 1990s, should have been mentioned as an all-time great for that program. Joining him should have been baseball’s Vincent De Angelis (’39), football’s Eugene Bo Sherman and women’s soccer’s Shannon Higgins-Cirovski. Wrestling coach Ed Rota, a member of the GW Athletic Hall of Fame, should also have been cited.

-David Holt

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